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Imminent Burn-Out? (Part 4—The Next Word and Resolutions)

  • Posted on November 21, 2011 at 12:00 PM

Again, I knew I was adjacent to the autism spectrum, I read about Rachel’s experiences, and I panicked.

The threat to autistic children is real. The threat to autistic adults is real. Combine the two and the threat becomes even stronger. And these threats apply directly to my family. This is why I fight. This is why I advocate. It’s not the only reason, of course. If my family was suddenly safe from all future threats, if we got a pass on all the discrimination and prejudice, well then I’d still fight—because nobody should have to face this kind of threat. But we do. It’s real. Right now, my boys cannot advocate for themselves on this level. They cannot face down CPS and win. They shouldn’t have to; I shouldn’t have to. But I had to and I did, but if I had to do all over again, with the loss of functioning that Rachel described, I would lose. And that possibility is incredibly scary. The consequences for my children are terrifying.

Reading Rachel’s words, I felt this terrible ticking clock hanging over my head. I drive myself hard—too hard. I know that. Everybody who knows me (in-person) knows that. Periods of burn-out, of being too tired to keep up, of running out spoons, of hiding in my basement office to avoid the very loud noises my children make when they’re all playing in parallel—these things are inevitable, and as long as Mark and I are a team and I can keep up my end of the bargain, they’re just part of the flow of our lives.

But what if I couldn’t keep up? What if it wasn’t temporary? What if it stretched on for months or years? Pardon my language please, but my thoughts could best be summed up: Oh shit! Is that going to happen to me?

I kept reading. I finished The Uncharted Path and moved onto Blazing My Trail and…I kept reading, sighing in relief. While I don’t mean to minimize the significance of burn-out, the dramatic shift in abilities got a new explanation in Blazing My Trail. They were due, to a great degree, to a medication she took that made things worse instead of better.

The relief was palpable. I know with certainty never to take that drug. Besides, I’m horrible about taking daily medications. And I try medication only as a last resort—or after significant experience that it will be necessary, such as with bronchitis and antibiotics. And, well, the only time I found a psychological medication (for example, an anti-depressant) that didn’t provide more side-effects than positive effects was when I had that terrible reaction to a birth control shot that lead to a serious case of post-partum depression. The drugs then were just a temporary fix to get me by until the birth control hormones were out of my system and it was only effective because my depression was more poignantly chemical than usual and far stronger than I usually experience.

So, avoid drugs—check.

But, that’s not enough. She also described a plan that helped her regain abilities she’d feared she’d lost forever. It was simply a matter of taking care of herself and being responsive to her distinct needs.

Now, that’s not as easy or as obvious as it sounds. Not for me. I’d always thought that I should be my lowest priority, after family, God, work, school, friends, etc. I knew I had to sharpen the saw and all that…but that didn’t make it a priority, did it? Not really. Certainly not.

This scared me into reevaluating and reassessing the importance of my own well-being. Because, yes, actually, I am a priority. As a caretaker, I need to take care of myself so I can continue to take care of others. It seems obvious. In fact, I knew it, on an intellectual level. Reading Rachel’s story has made it visceral.

So, take better care of myself—check.

I can’t stop pushing myself. There’s too much to do. But I don’t have to push myself so hard that I break. I don’t have to ignore my own needs and well-being. In fact, if I pay attention, I’ll be able to do more, because I won’t get quite so tired.

But, wow, was it a scary, rocky trip—and I didn’t even have to live through it!