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What’s Out There?

  • Posted on July 30, 2014 at 10:00 AM

Parents worry a lot about what it will be like when our children go out there, out into the world. For some, worries revolve around the violence and crime that permeates our world. For no reason, for no reason at all, a car could slam into a child and take that child from this world. Does it really matter if the road was slippery due to rain or snow? Does it really matter if the driver was tired or drunk? Does it really matter if the driver was in a get-away-car or going for a joy ride? What matters is that the child is gone and there’s no reason for it.

For some, worries revolve around society and the judgments society makes about individuals. For no reason, for no reason at all, a child can be harassed or bullied or killed. Does it really matter if the child is gay or straight? Does it matter if the child is typically developing or developmentally delayed? Does it matter if the child is autistic or crippled or seemingly normal? Does it matter if the child is black or white? What matters is that the child is hurt, scarred, or gone and there’s no reason for it.

For some, worries revolve around the child. For no reason, for no reason at all, a child can be sick or dying. Does it really matter if it’s leukemia or AIDS? Does it really matter if it’s epilepsy or traumatic brain injury? Does it matter if the disease is rare or common? Does it matter if it’s acquired or if the child was simply born that way? Does it matter if the life expectancy is a month or a year? What matters is that a child is hurting, growing weaker, slipping away, and then gone and there’s no reason for it.

I look out into the world and sometimes what I see terrifies me. I don’t want to go out there. I don’t want my children to go out there. And I honestly just don’t get it. There’s enough pain and suffering in this world that we can do absolutely nothing about! Why in the world would anyone want to bring more pain and suffering onto others by committing crimes, acts of violence, or acts of negligence?

I realize, logically, that these people aren’t thinking about other people. The man who drinks himself stupid and then gets behind the wheel isn’t thinking about the people he might hit along the way. He’s drowning some sorrow in booze and then thinking, if you can call it that, about getting home. The man who holds up the convenience store isn’t thinking about the people he’s robbing or the people he might hurt or kill in the process. He’s thinking about what he wants and the quickest way to get it. The kid who bullies another isn’t thinking about that other kid. He’s thinking about his own pain, his own inadequacies, his own need to feel better, superior, cooler, or whatever.

I think about other people. I think about my family, my friends, my neighbors, and the strangers that are around me. I look before I backup. I drive carefully and soberly. I don’t drive when I’m impaired. I’m cautious, careful, hardworking, and loving. In a moment, my world could be changed by someone who isn’t like me. In a moment, my child or my husband or I could be gone from this world. And so I worry. I try not to think about it, but I worry nonetheless.

Sometimes I wonder why parents like me, parents of children with autism, try so hard to get their children out there, out into the world. Sometimes I think we’d all be safer if we just stayed home whenever possible. Go to work, go to the store, go out to eat upon occasion, but stay home and stay safe as much as possible. But even that kind of safety is an illusion. What’s out there can come in here without warning.