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Making Doors

  • Posted on February 21, 2014 at 10:00 AM

As much effort as I intend to expend on changing the tract that Alex has been placed on, the long-term goal isn’t necessarily to “tract” him at all. You see, Alex has talent. Alex has had many disadvantages and has foregone the typical art instruction children receive in the United States for many years, yet he has an extraordinary interest and talent with visual arts.

These aren’t just the words of a proud mother. I know that I have little skill in assessing any form of visual art and even less aptitude in creating them. So, the best I could discern was to recognize that Alex’s art—indeed the art of all four of our boys—is better than anything I can produce, and to recognize (from the art training I have received) certain qualities that seemed rather remarkable. But, even to me, this didn’t mean much. So, I obtained the opinions of others who have more skill with assessing and creating visual arts. Turns out, I wasn’t wrong. In fact, the reactions I’ve gotten to Alex’s artwork (not to mention the other boys’) has been quite enthusiastic.

Now, as a professional writer, which is a form of art, I know how difficult it can be to make a career out of a talent and interest in a particular art form. Even when you have the advantages of encouragement, advanced schooling, and more or less “normal” interpersonal skills, advancing a career in the arts is a huge challenge. Many people try and more fail than succeed. The automatic conclusion is that it would be ridiculous to pursue such a path for Alex, because the odds are very much against him.

Yet, I also know that there are people with disabilities, even profound disabilities, who do pursue art as a career and do succeed in their endeavors. I also know that Alex experiences joy when creating his art and he experiences joy when sharing his art with others. Now, Alex experiences joy doing several different things—watching videos and swimming are prime examples. But art is one of the few things that he experiences joy when sharing it with others. This is significant in ways I can’t even articulate. If you get it, good; if not, well, then, I guess you’ll just have to take my word for it.

So, yes, the odds are long. Yes, it’s not something that will earn him a living right out of school. Yes, it’s something that will require special support just to make it possible. But it’s worth it. It’s worth pursuing. It’s worth it, because everybody deserves the opportunity to at least try to do what they love for a living.

So, you see, I’m not just looking for backdoors to open up a more acceptable tract for my son. I’m going to make the doors he needs to do what he loves.