You are currently browsing all posts tagged with 'doctors'.
Displaying 1 entry.

Appointment for Worry

  • Posted on July 17, 2013 at 10:00 AM

After Willy had his first major seizure, the one we knew was a seizure, I took him to a neurologist up in Madison. After discussing our family history, I took Alex to the neurologist, too. The neurologist had enough reason for concern to recommend we conducted some additional tests, including a second MRI. At Willy’s last appointment, we canceled Alex’s appointment to discuss the results of his MRI, because the doctor had peeked at the results and declared all was well.

Then, the nurse called and uncanceled the appointment.

Naturally, I was concerned. Was all not well after all? Actually, those who know me better know that I was, underneath a front of my own version of normal, seething with anxiety.

We waited months, of course. We arrived in a rush, of course. Then, to my surprise, it turned out our appointment was never actually rescheduled. It took some persistence with the receptionist, but finally she called the nurse and the nurse talked to the doctor and the doctor, being the conscientious man that he is, agreed to see us.

We met with the nurse, who asked me leading questions. We met with the medical student, who asked more leading questions. I got the impression that we’d missed something, because all those questions were geared toward revealing the changes in Alex’s behaviors that we’d seen.

But, we hadn’t seen any. Alex seemed like Alex, which is far from normal, but it is his own version of normal, so I wasn’t concerned about that! Oh no, what had I missed? What hadn’t I seen? Had I been too busy to notice that something was really wrong with my child?

Then, the doctor came in. I explained why I’m here. He was obviously relieved. He explained what had happened. I was immediately relieved.

The gist of it is this: The nurse was NOT supposed to uncancel our appointment; she was supposed to confirm that the doctor had compared MRI results and verified that there was no significant change to the area of concern and that there was therefore no cause for concern. In short, Alex didn’t need to come back unless we observed significant, worrisome alterations in his behavior. So, obviously, when we showed up for an appointment that didn’t exist, the doctor thought we had observed significant, worrisome alterations in Alex’s behavior.

All that worrying for nothing but a case of the miscommunications! At least it ended with relief.