Revealing Research

  • Posted on September 26, 2009 at 12:00 PM

I admit when it came to the “autism epidemic” I took the statistics pretty much at face value.  I didn’t interpret the situation as dire, but I assumed there was a causal factor other than broadened definitions and increased awareness that supported the growing number of autism diagnoses in children.  Left Brain/Right Brain of the UK was the first source I’d seen that convincingly shed both doubt and light on those statistics and raised issues of bias that I needed to consider.

Now, research also coming out of the UK sheds further light on this very important issue.  I read this article posted in Medical News Today:

This ground-breaking study shows for the first time an estimate of how many adults are living with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) in England. The study into the prevalence of autism spectrum disorders among adults shows that one in every hundred adults living in households has the condition - broadly the same rate as that cited for children.

The implications of this research are, in my opinion, nothing short of profound in their implications of the politics of autism.  Further relevance is revealed in these findings:

  • While 1.0 per cent of the adult population had an autism spectrum disorder, the rate for men was higher (1.8 per cent) than for women (0.2 per cent). This was in line with studies among child populations which show higher rates amongst boys.
  • People who were single were more likely to be assessed with an autism spectrum disorder than other marital statuses.
  • Among men, prevalence of an autism spectrum disorder was lower among those with a degree level qualification than among those with no qualifications.
  • Men renting their home from a social landlord were more likely than those living in other types of housing to have an autism spectrum disorder.
  • Adults with an autism spectrum disorder were no more likely to be using services for those with mental or emotional problems than the rest of the adult general population.

If I ever doubted we needed to take a serious look at how we, both in the US and internationally, approach autism this offers a never-before-seen glimpse that shows very clearly that we do.  Misinformation and assumptions having us looking for causes and solutions to this false “epidemic,” when what we really should be doing (and should have been doing all along) is using our resources to find ways to solve problems people with autism face every day.

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